Author Archives: josh

Episode 6 – Can’t Ride It If They Stole It

Bike theft is a growing issue in big bike cities. In Seattle, three times as many bikes were stolen last year than in 2008. In this episode of The Bicycle Story, we explore the problem, the police’s often lackluster response, how advocates are working to fight theft, and the sometimes crazy and dangerous lengths people go to get their bikes back. Thanks to Max Wigley, Brock Howell of Bicycle Security Advocates and Tom Fucoloro of Seattle Bike Blog for their sharing their insight.

Music:
“Dirt Rhodes,” “Danse Morialta,” “Raw,” “Big Mojo”
Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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Episode 5: Tillie Anderson, Champion of the World

With seemingly more coverage of the issue recently than ever, women’s fight for an equal place in bike racing kind of feels like a modern phenomenon. But women have been fighting for the right to race bikes for nearly the entirety of bike racing history. In the late 1800s, a young Swedish immigrant named Tillie Anderson joined that fight and quickly became the star of American cycling with a nearly flawless record and the world champion title to her name.

Music:
“Intractable,” “Floating Cities”
Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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Episode 4: A Brief History Of The American Sharrow

It may come as a surprise, but in some circles of the bike world, sharrows are a source of passionate debate. Are they a lip service from cities hoping to appease cyclists without spending any money or political capital? Are they a viable form of safe infrastructure? In this episode, we trace the origins of sharrows back to their inventor James Mackay, P.E., a former Denver bike planner and talk to bike advocate Noah Budnick and University of Denver, Colorado professor Wes Marshall to look at the evolution of biking and bike infrastructure in America over the last 25 years.

Music:
“Bicycle,” “Night Cave,” “Finding the Balance”
Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Episode 3: Ditch Your Car, Climb a Mountain

Matt Alford has been a rock climber and mountaineer for most of his life. For the better part of three decades now, he’s been exploring the mountains near his home in Seattle and far beyond. Doing so has required logging countless hours and miles in a car. When that fact started weighing on Matt’s mind 10 years ago, he decided the solution was to start putting together Front Door Adventures: climbing and skiing trips accessed completely by bike and mass transit.

Correction: In the opening of the episode I say that “Personal car use contributes relatively little to greenhouse gas emissions compared to industrial agriculture, airplanes, dirty energy and others.” This is an understatement of personal car, truck, and SUV use’s impact. According to the EPA, transportation contributed 27 percent of the total greenhouse gas emissions in 2013. Of that 27 percent, passenger cars, SUVs, pickup trucks, and minivans account for over half of the emissions generated. 

Music:
“Go Cart,” “Dub Feral ,” “Universal”
Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

The Caucasus Mountains Will Fire Up Your Wanderlust

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Riding in Georgia’s Caucasus Mountains. Photo by Ross Measures.

Joey Schusler is a pro mountain biker, skier, and filmmaker who’s made films about bikepacking and backcountry ski adventures in Peru, Mexico, Colorado, and elsewhere. His latest short The Trail to Kazbegi, documents a bikepacking trip through the Caucasus Mountains in the former Soviet republic of Georgia. It is pure adventure porn filled with amazing trails and even more amazing mountains. Give it a watch.

The Trail To Kazbegi from Joey Schusler on Vimeo.